Pulse Room – AGM Summer Break | DigiKey

Pulse Room – AGM Summer Break | DigiKey


(upbeat rock music) – Hey, my name is Grace and this is Digi-Key’s Another Geek
M0ment, Summer Break Edition. Thanks to our friends at
Nordeast Makers in Minneapolis for letting us use their
maker space for our projects. Today I’m gonna talk to you
about the pulse room tutorial, courtesy of Collin
Cunningham and Adafruit. This project is also available
on our Maker.io site. For those of you unfamiliar with Maker.io, that it Digi-Key’s maker
page for different projects. I think this project is interesting ’cause it’s able to bridge my interest in different medical applications through these unique sensors that I’ll get to in just a moment while also giving me plenty of practice with soldering and programming, which I’ll also get to; there
were quite a few issues. Let me start first with what
to expect with these LEDs. They run through a PWM signal. If you’re unfamiliar that’s
pulse width modulation. And that has to do with the LED output. So it’ll pulse just like your heart and we’re trying to make it look like your heart’s beating in your room. This was a lot of new stuff for me. I am not a veteran with
soldering by any means. So if you look at the back
of the board, you know, probably not the best
soldering job that you’ve seen. Definitely will take a
few, a few practice rounds if you haven’t tried it before. To begin though, this FET works to amplify the millivolt signal that’s
coming from your sensor so the LEDs will actually light. They need a stronger signal
that what’s supplied. So this FET will take care of that. Also here is this terminal block. This board is capable of
powering two LED strings. I only have one, but
you can make, you know, two of these and have four LEDs
as Collin does in his video. Moving on, I will talk
about the Feather board, the Feather M0 and the Music Maker is what I used in my project. So this top board is the Feather M0. Right here is your micro USB connection that you used for uploading your code, which I will also get to. And then this bottom which I
won’t disconnect in this video, just because Collin
spells it out pretty well. And again my soldering (laughs) soldering was definitely a learning curve. All I used on these boards to solder onto the music
wing and the M0 board were headers; this is not the
type of header that I used. Instead I used this header. What type of header is this? Inline headers, they
might have another name, but just choosing which one
works best with your project. The connections on the M0 board as you can see, are pretty minimal. That schematic is shown
on the project page, again, available on Maker.io. Oh, and again, this has
the terminal block as well. This one’s five pin, the
other one was six pin. You’ll use three of these for ground and two of these for the PWM signal to send to your LED driver board. You’ll need to download the Arduino IDE from the Arduino webpage, and to make sure you download your Arduino driver. Here you can choose what
boards you want to include. Remember you’re using
the Feather M0 board. (upbeat rock music) Now when I was working with my code, I ran into quite a few compiling issues, which was really good in teaching me not only how to program
but how to troubleshoot. I haven’t really had to do that before because my classes walk
me through everything, but it was nice to get that
troubleshooting experience. Look to the Adafruit and Github pages. Those were very helpful for me. Another issue that I ran into when I was working with my code was that I overcomplicated it quite a bit. I ended up downloading the pulse room code many many, many, many times unnecessarily, and I think my IDE was a little confused as to which pulse_room.ino file to use, because there were about four. (laughs) So I had to remove all of those files, re-download the pulse_room file. So, I will show you this finished project. You’ll notice the LEDs are
attached to my driver board. The DC power adapter is also attached. The music wing is attached
with this pulse sensor, which will read the changing
oxygen levels in your blood. There’s a lot of information on this and I would recommend checking it out because it’s pretty fascinating. But if you’re not interested in that there’s lots of other
components of this project that I would encourage looking into. Again, there’s tons of
information out there. These LED strips are really nice because if you are installing this in a living room or a
room of any shape or size for that matter, you can
peel off this 3M tape, it’s available with a sticky
side, which I will do. And I will stick this not
to itself but to the table. Just gonna lay it like that. Now that I’ve explained my project I can show you how to set it up. Give the Feather M0 some power. Plug in your speaker. This music wing down here has your standard audio connection. Click it in. I have already plugged this
in to my power down here. And then I will have to open my computer so that my Feather board can be powered. And the red light is on,
so it has some power. Next I need a test subject. Noah, come into my office. – Thank you. – I will connect this
to your middle finger. – You’re not gonna shock me, are you? – Middle finger. No, I’m not gonna, I’m
gonna try not to shock you. We’ll see how it goes. (chuckles) We’re gonna wait for a steady beat. This red light will beat with your heart. So I can turn the switch on
when we have a steady heartbeat and we’ll see not a mess,
it’ll be nice, hopefully. (laughs) – Hopefully.
– That’s the plan. Alright, we’ll turn it on. Alright, get some sound. (soft beep) Maybe. (deep pulsing) There we go, perfect. Remember all of these
boards and project tutorials are available on Digi-Key’s
website through the shop and also on the Maker.io project pages. Thanks for listening! I’d say that’s about 60 beats per minute. – [Noah] So I’m not that nervous. – [Grace] Nah, you’re alright. (upbeat rock music)

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